About Dr. Avidon Appel

A caring, well trained physician practicing for 11 years. Trained in Cosmetic and Aesthetic techniques. Only Local Mohel certified in Conservative and Reform Traditions. Covering Philadelphia, Montgomery and Bucks Counties.

Services

Services Overview

Brit Milah

ברית מילה

Known as a “bris”. It is the circumcision ceremony performed on a male infant by a Mohel on the 8th day the infant’s life (even if the 8th day falls on Shabbat or another Jewish Holiday). The ceremony is usually followed by a Seduat Mitzvah (celebratory meal).

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Baby Naming

It is a mitzvah (commandment) to give a child a Hebrew name.  Throughout Jewish history, special emphasis has been placed on Hebrew names.  Tradition teaches that members of all generations entered into a unique relationship with G-d at Sinai.  This relationship, known as the brit or covenant, joins us in the task of perfecting the world.  The naming of a baby is a way of entering them into the covenant as well.

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Simchat Bat or Brit Bat

שמחת בת

Is the celebration of the daughter.  Welcomes this new life into the Covenant of Israel. It officially welcomes her into the family and community.   During this ceremony we give her the Hebrew name by which she will be known. May be held on the 8th day or at a later date.  This usually includes readings that reflect the hopes an dreams of the parents for their daughter.

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Circumcisions

A procedure in which the foreskin is removed in order to uncover the glans. This procedure is done for many reasons: religious, cultural, family tradition, personal hygiene, preventative health as well as public health.

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Here are some valuable resources:

Preparation of the home

A sturdy surface (table) and good lighting.

Lower the temperature in the house approximately 2 hours before the start of the ceremony, as this will keep everyone more comfortable.

Preparation of the baby

The baby should be fed 1-2 hours before the actual start of the ceremony.  He may wear a pull-up gown, or “onesie”. No pants please.

Items needed for the ceremony

-Diapers

-Wipes

-Paper towels

-2 or 3 chairs (1 being the Chair of Elijah)

-Kiddush cup

-Kosher sweet wine/grape juice

-Pre-poured wine/grape juice (white if avoiding stains) for your guests to share in the kiddush

-Uncut Challah

-Kippot

-A table cloth if desired

-Pictures or clothing for display if desired

-Candles/candle holders if desired

Preparation for the ceremony

The Brit Milah ceremony is a wonderful time to honor people and traditions.  Do start thinking about Hebrew names if you have not already done so. Two good resources are The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew Names by Alfred Kolatch and The New Jewish Baby Book by Anita Diamant

The two of the roles you may designate during the circumcision portion:

Sandak – this is the person(s) who holds the baby for the circumcision. This can be a family member, often this is the baby’s grandfather, this person must be Jewish. The thought is that you would like your son to “absorb” the good qualities of this person(s).

K’vater/K’vatterin – these people are charged with the responsibility of ensuring that your son has a Jewish education. These are essentially the religious “Godparents” of your son.  Often the K’vater and K’vatterin are the baby’s aunt and uncle, or cousins, or good friends – and should be Jewish.

Preparation of the home

Lower the temperature in the house approximately 2 hours before the start of the ceremony, as this will keep everyone more comfortable.

Preparation of the baby

The baby should be fed 1-2 hours before the actual start of the ceremony.

Items needed for the ceremony

-2 or 3 chairs

-Kiddush cup

-Kosher sweet wine/grape juice

-Pre-poured wine/grape juice (white if avoiding stains) if you want your guests to share in the kiddush

-Uncut Challah

-Kippot

-A table cloth if desired

-Pictures or clothing for display if desired

-Candles/candle holders if desired

Preparation for the ceremony

This ceremony is a wonderful time to honor people and traditions. Do start thinking about Hebrew names if you have not already done so.  Two good resources are The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew Names by Alfred Kolatch and The New Jewish Baby Book by Anita Diamant.

Contact Us

If you have any questions please fill out the form, give us a call or send an email.  

 

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